August 14, 2010

August 14th Stream

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August 13, 2010

August 13th Stream

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Shared 2 photos.
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CREDboard aggregates multiple media types (including text, audio, photos, and video) from multiple networks — such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and industry blogs — providing a comprehensive dashboard for monitoring customer interactions. The objective is for companies to know who’s talking about what, where and how often in an attempt to “cover all the bases” to protect their reputations online. The product is designed to help individuals and/or departments not only update and monitor Social Media sites, but also take action when necessary.

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Shared 4 photos.
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Hi, Everyone —
I’m happy to say that we have more international libraries signing up for National Gaming Day this year. Unfortunately, we can’t ship the free donation to them, but they still want to participate (hooray for international libraries!).
Right now, a foreign services librarian with the State Department named Elenita is working with libraries worldwide that are partnering with U.S. embassies. She’s asking for our help to give them ideas for games they can play on NGD (Saturday, November 13).
Games and Gaming
read more

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New TSL post: It’s, Like, Confusing – http://bit.ly/bEMSk6 (more on the "like" issues re: Target on Facebook, including infolit/privacy) [shifted]
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From ALA Connect: Paper-based games?: Hi, Everyone —
I’m happy to say that we have more international libraries s… http://bit.ly/9H3par [shifted]
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@JustinLibrarian thanks! I’m fascinated by the whole thing and can’t look away :-p [shifted]

It's, Like, So Confusing

Filed under: blog — Tags: , , , , , , — tsladmin @ 12:35 pm

Following up on last week’s post about how Facebook is changing the meaning of “like” online, I’ve been noticing more disconcerting behavior on Target’s Facebook page.
Until yesterday, Target hadn’t posted anything to its wall since July 26th. It wasn’t clear if they were building a strategy internally, but the new post makes it obvious that they’ve decided to ride out the storm by ignoring it and letting their customers duke it out on their wall. The new post links to specials for college students and makes absolutely no reference to the controversy. As of this morning, there are 303 comments on that post and 367 people “like” it.
Target clearly isn’t going to mention the issues, respond, or engage in a conversation on Facebook. Interesting strategy, and we’ll see how it plays out. But as I’m watching this case study develop, some themes are emerging and raising some problematic flags.
As one might expect after what seems like an eternity online, the commenters are no longer mostly people upset with Target’s actions. And predictably, as seems to happen with so many discussions about politics and homosexuality, the discussion is devolving pretty quickly. Some users are flagging each other for bad behavior, just because they disagree with the person’s opinions. Some are insulting other commenters, and the whole wall is becoming a referendum on a political issue. I haven’t read every comment, but I’m confident Godwin’s Law is proven there somewhere.
None of this is new behavior to be sure, but has this happened before on such a mainstream company’s page, especially while the company itself is ignoring it? The fact that it’s Target makes for some interesting issues.
For example, if you read a sample of the comments closely, you’ll find a potentially worrisome information literacy problem. If you go back to the beginning of the comments thread on the August 12 post, there are some users whose entire comment consists of, “If you don’t like Target, why do you ‘like’ this page?” or “If you don’t like Target, why did you become a fan of them?”
It’s unclear to me whether these folks realize that users have to like the page in order to comment or if they’re just being snarky about it. Even though these folks had to “like” the page themselves in order to leave their own questioning comments, I’m leaning towards believing that they truly don’t realize that “like” now means “comments enabled.” As David Lee King said on my previous post, “it looks like the ‘Like’ but­ton is really an entrance fee/ticket, or the ‘door’ to the event….” But there’s a large group of people out there that don’t realize that “like” now has subtext and is loaded with new meanings and requirements. I worry that they truly don’t understand that the boycotters have no choice but to “like” Target if they want to participate in the discussion.

"Why are you guys even a fan?"

Other commenters honestly can’t seem to understand why someone who is upset with Target would be posting on the company’s wall in the first place. It seems that there’s still a disconnect between “a company’s web presence” and an interactive, community.” Heck, this is true even for Target, which continues to ignore the community and treat its page as a one-way announcement channel. A lot of folks participating in this thread haven’t made the mental leap from “Just Target” to “Target + Others” as a new norm, even though they’re able to scratch their heads in the comments themselves.

"I just wanted to 'Like' a Target page...."

Close reading of the threads also makes it clear that quite a few Target fans didn’t know anything about the controversy until they visited the Facebook page and saw the comments. This further confirms the ongoing switch from a small number of “official,” mainstream news sources to personal news streams on social networking sites. More and more people are getting their news online from their networks, not from newscasters. (Incidentally, if you need to make a case for why your library should be on Facebook, this is a pretty good reason – in order to be part of your users news stream.)

"What did Target do?"

Overall, there’s a lot going on here, and I encourage you to keep tabs on Target’s page to see how it plays out. It can be difficult to dip into the emerging incivility and disrespect, but it’s educational, especially for any organization that has a Facebook presence. These types of cases are illustrating how the shift from us going out to find information to it coming to us, filtered through our networks, will have an impact on organizations. They also expose a whole host of other issues, from information literacy gaps to privacy concerns. For example, I was going to erase the names of the commenters in the screenshots, but technically it’s all public information, so why hide it? Do the people leaving rants and invectives on the Target post/wall truly understand that those comments are completely public?
On Facebook, 831 people “like” confusion, but I’m not sure anyone really likes it in the Target context.

August 12, 2010

August 12th Stream

Filed under: Lifestream — tsladmin @ 11:00 pm
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@sffitzpatrick I hear ya. coffee this week? [shifted]
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Cocoon - 06
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Cocoon - 05
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Shared done.
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Shareflow lets you share ideas, files and more with a specific group — without the hassles and confusion of long group email threads. "Google Wave replacement"

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August 11, 2010

August 11th Stream

Filed under: Lifestream — tsladmin @ 11:00 pm
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is anyone selling an inflatable cubicle slide yet? paging @thinkgeek…. [shifted]
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@hazman sorry, Hazman, I’m not at #ifla2010. would definitely have a drink with you if I was :( [shifted]

August 10, 2010

August 10th Stream

Filed under: Lifestream — tsladmin @ 11:00 pm
generic (feed #9)
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@librarianbyday that’s correct. networking is a member perk we’ll be slicing and dicing ALA by your interests and network in the future [shifted]
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August 9, 2010

August 9th Stream

Filed under: Lifestream — tsladmin @ 11:00 pm
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@Fiona_Bradley @megoc @Simon_Lemstra @shanachietour thanks for the shoutout! hope you’re having a good time at #ifla2010 [shifted]

August 8, 2010

August 8th Stream

Filed under: Lifestream — tsladmin @ 11:00 pm
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August 5, 2010

August 5th Stream

Filed under: Lifestream — tsladmin @ 11:00 pm
generic (feed #9)
twitter (feed #3)
@kgs @tadawes sending a request to update the page. thx for the heads up. [shifted]
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August 4, 2010

August 4th Stream

Filed under: Lifestream — tsladmin @ 11:00 pm
generic (feed #9)
lris: Biblio Bouts
twitter (feed #3)
PM crowd: New TSL post: When Like Doesn’t Mean Like, or Using Like to Target Target http://bit.ly/9kWA7E [shifted]
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