January 31, 2010

January 31st Stream

twitter (feed #3)
dear location-based ser­vices: offer­ing an iphone app as the only way to check in is like design­ing 4 inter­net explorer. pls join us in 2010 [shifted]
delicious (feed #4)

“Another bub­bling intra-generational gap, as any mod­ern par­ent knows, is that younger chil­dren tend to be ever more art­ful mul­ti­taskers. Stud­ies per­formed by Dr. Rosen at Cal State show that 16– to 18-year-olds per­form seven tasks, on aver­age, in their free time — like tex­ting on the phone, send­ing instant mes­sages and check­ing Face­book while sit­ting in front of the television.

Peo­ple in their early 20s can han­dle only six, Dr. Rosen found, and those in their 30s per­form about five and a half.

That ver­sa­til­ity is great when they’re killing time, but will a younger gen­er­a­tion be as focused at school and work as their forebears? ”

generic (feed #9)
twitter (feed #3)
@griffey doesn’t really mat­ter for you, right? you’re aban­don­ing the #superduper­but­notquitemag­i­cal #iphone regard­less :) [shifted]
twitter (feed #3)
@griffey maybe the addi­tion of iUni­corn will keep you on the #iphone but I’m tak­ing bets on how much longer u can hold out against #android [shifted]
twitter (feed #3)
@griffey yeah, just like inter­net explorer [shifted]
flickr (feed #5)
Shared 6 photos.
delicious (feed #4)

“Stats pub­lished by Nielsen show that social media usage has increased by 82% in the last year, an astro­nom­i­cal rise. Face­book (Face­book), Twit­ter (Twit­ter), YouTube, blogs, and social inter­ac­tion are becom­ing the focus of our online inter­ac­tions, even more than search.

We’re social crea­tures, so it was only a mat­ter of time until we fig­ured out how to make the web an effi­cient medium for com­mu­ni­ca­tion, shar­ing, and forg­ing friend­ships. Now that we’re finally imple­ment­ing the social layer though, it’s tough to find a sce­nario where the rise of social media doesn’t continue.

In ten years, when you access the web, most of the time you spend will be to con­nect with your friends. Almost all of that will be on social net­works and through social media. It will be the #1 rea­son why we ever pull out our phones, tablets, or computers.”

twitter (feed #3)
the theme of the #gram­mys seems to be #mashups [shifted]
generic (feed #10)
generic (feed #10)
delicious (feed #4)

“To add to that idea, some­thing like #ALAQnA would be great. The #edchat model is a ter­rific one to fol­low: a few nights at a week, at a set time, all of the #edchat twit­ter­ers respond-to/converse-about top­ics like “How can edu­ca­tors effec­tively assess stu­dents in the 21st cen­tury?”. The con­ver­sa­tions are amaz­ing if you fol­low the chats live, and they stay on twit­ter for the con­ver­sa­tion to con­tinue in the days (and some­times weeks) to follow.”


10:40 pm Comments (0)

January 30, 2010

January 30th Stream

flickr (feed #5)
Shared 3 photos.
generic (feed #10)
generic (feed #10)
generic (feed #10)

10:40 pm Comments (0)

January 29, 2010

January 29th Stream

hulu (feed #17)
generic (feed #11)
flickr (feed #5)

10:40 pm Comments (0)

January 28, 2010

January 28th Stream

generic (feed #11)
generic (feed #11)
generic (feed #11)
generic (feed #11)
Shared The Fab Four.
generic (feed #11)
generic (feed #10)
twitter (feed #3)
@Monica2point0 @itsjustkate thank you for the birth­day wishes! it was indeed quite happy :) [shifted]
flickr (feed #5)
Shared 8 photos.
hulu (feed #17)
generic (feed #10)
youtube (feed #7)
delicious (feed #4)

“I’ve recently been look­ing for sets of icons for all of the social web­sites that I belong to for my web­site, blog, and also print hand­outs. In the course of my research I’ve come across some excel­lent icon sets that design­ers are giv­ing away for free. If you have a need for social media icons for your library web­site, per­sonal web­site, or blog, here are a few resources that I found help­ful.” — via @ellyssa

delicious (feed #4)

“In this arti­cle we will show you how you can cre­ate a con­trib­u­tors page which will dis­play a list of authors with avatars or user­photo and any other infor­ma­tion that you like. This tuto­r­ial is an inter­me­di­ate level tutorial.”

delicious (feed #4)

“In this tuto­r­ial, we will be using Word­Press and Feed­burner with a few plu­g­ins to cre­ate a sim­ple Email Newslet­ter Ser­vice for your Word­Press blog. You can track the per­for­mance of your newslet­ter by check­ing how many sub­scribers you have, how many clicks each link gets and much more.”


10:40 pm Comments (0)

January 27, 2010

January 27th Stream

delicious (feed #4)
delicious (feed #4)

Every year, we throw a big, game party to ring in the new year. This year (2010) is our houses 100-year birth­day, so we cel­e­brated with cup­cakes…
…and the cup­cakes were a game.
Here they are in ran­dom order — see how many you can guess! Mouse over the ques­tion mark to reveal the answer.” — via Iris (circulating)

delicious (feed #4)
Shared phylomon.org.

“Well 2010 is here, a.k.a. the Inter­na­tional Year of Bio­di­ver­sity, and to us at the SCQ, it means that were finally ready to go ahead with our long awaited phy­lomon project. “What is this?” you ask? Well, its an online ini­tia­tive aimed at cre­at­ing a Poke­mon card type resource but with real crea­tures on dis­play in full “char­ac­ter design” won­der. Not only that — but we plan to have the sci­en­tific com­mu­nity weigh in to deter­mine the con­tent on such cards (note that the cards above are only a mock-up of what that con­tent might be), as well as folks who love gam­ing to try and design inter­est­ing ways to use the cards. Then to top it all off, mem­bers of the teacher com­mu­nity will par­tic­i­pate to see whether these cards have edu­ca­tional merit. Best of all, the hope is that this will all occur in a non-commercial-open-access-open-source-because-basically-this-is-good-for-you-your-children-and-your-planet sort of way.” — via @walkingpaper

delicious (feed #4)
Shared Snap­sort.

“find the best cam­era for you”

twitter (feed #3)
dropped another hard drive in the home server. had 35% free but 1.36TB means I now have another 67% to fill up. work­ing on it. #easy­peasy [shifted]
generic (feed #10)
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twitter (feed #3)
@mstephens7 @griffey what a great way to start it, too. thanks! :) [shifted]
generic (feed #10)
twitter (feed #3)
@steverubel hon­estly, as long as you can pull chairs up to it and set things on it, who really cares about the Apple table? [shifted]
generic (feed #10)
delicious (feed #4)

“For this semi-scientific analy­sis I looked at 18 library mem­ber­ship orga­ni­za­tions, includ­ing state and national orga­ni­za­tions. I did not include indi­vid­ual libraries or state libraries. I did include sub-groups and divi­sions. The list of orga­ni­za­tions was cho­sen more or less at ran­dom and is biased towards orga­ni­za­tions that sup­port New Eng­land libraries. It is by no mea­sure a com­plete list, so feel free to sug­gest one’s that I missed.

I uti­lized seven ele­ments to com­pare the orga­ni­za­tions. For each ele­ment, the orga­ni­za­tion received one point if the infor­ma­tion met the cri­te­ria out­lined below, and zero points if it did not. A higher rat­ing is equated with a higher score. You can use this method for a quick check of your organization’s Twit­ter presence.”

twitter (feed #3)
@library_chan @jaimebc thanks! wish I could share cake with you :) [shifted]
delicious (feed #4)

“Here they are to save the day—or at least the research project. Rochester librar­i­ans call on their inner super­heroes as part of a new effort to let stu­dents know how to find help.”

generic (feed #10)
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5:00 pm Comments (0)

January 26, 2010

January 26th Stream

twitter (feed #3)
new post: Jan­u­ary 24th Stream http://bit.ly/55q9Jl [shifted]
delicious (feed #4)
twitter (feed #3)
I’ve been on the web too long. I just called a friend’s home improve­ment project a redesign. [shifted]
generic (feed #10)
hulu (feed #17)
twitter (feed #3)
@cwcoxjr just remem­ber — garbage in, garbage out [shifted]
generic (feed #10)
delicious (feed #4)
twitter (feed #3)
new TSL post: You Don’t Know Me — http://bit.ly/7WjKmQ [shifted]
generic (feed #10)
blog (feed #12)

I recently par­tic­i­pated in a dis­cus­sion in which some­one posted a rumor that ALA requires pres­i­den­tial can­di­dates to prove they have $10,000 in their bank accounts in order to run their cam­paigns.
This rumor is cat­e­gor­i­cally false, as ver­i­fied for me by Mary Ghikas, Senior Asso­ciate Exec­u­tive Direc­tor at ALA. There are no mon­e­tary or finan­cial require­ments to run for ALA pres­i­dent, although you might need lots of caf­feine.
snopesALA

twitter (feed #3)
From ALA Con­nect: Myth: ALA checks your bank account to make sure you have $10,000 if run­ning for pres­i­dent: I rec… http://bit.ly/dAWLSG [shifted]

5:00 pm Comments (0)

You Don’t Know Me

Or, if you work at cer­tain com­pa­nies, you do. Or could.

I had some inter­est­ing con­ver­sa­tions about pri­vacy at ALA’s Mid­win­ter Meet­ing, which got me think­ing about which com­pa­nies prob­a­bly know the most about me.

I’ve thought about my own “walled gar­den” a lot and worked through what I’ll share pub­licly, pri­vately, and pre­tend pri­vately. Most things I share pub­licly, and you can see a list of many of the sites I use on my Friend­Feed account. It’s not dif­fi­cult to piece together infor­ma­tion about me by track­ing these sites, but over­all I’m more care­ful with spe­cific things like loca­tion information.

The rou­tine I’ve worked out is that Face­book is my only truly pri­vate post­ing area, although I do occa­sion­ally post some pic­tures for “friends and fam­ily only” on Flickr. Since I still don’t trust Face­book to not re-publish or claim own­er­ship of “pri­vate” con­tent (like pic­tures and videos), I don’t post any­thing orig­i­nal there except sta­tus updates and com­ments on friends’ updates. Even then, I don’t kid myself that those things are truly pri­vate (they’re the “pre­tend pri­vately” I men­tioned above). That’s why I’ve become a lot more selec­tive about who I’ll friend there, and why I post some Foursquare loca­tion updates there (rather than on Twitter).

So if you can find out so much infor­ma­tion about me pub­licly, which com­pa­nies know the most about me? It’s been a very thought-provoking exer­cise to come up with the fol­low­ing list. I tried to rank the com­pa­nies in order of how much daily infor­ma­tion I think they’re accu­mu­lat­ing about me, but it’s tough to decide if “what I’m eat­ing” equals “what I’m watching.”

  • Cell carrier/cellphone maker — they know my loca­tion at any given time, plus all of the data that goes through my phone (and I don’t have a land­line, so every­thing goes through my cell)
  • Cable com­pany = they know what I watch on TV and what I surf on the net
  • Bank = they know most of the places where I spend my money
  • Credit cards = they know a lot of places I spend my money
  • LISHost — hosts my web­site and email, which would include a lot of receipts for online purchases
  • Google = knows most of the things I search for and many things I read (via <http://reader.google.com/”>Google Reader); even though I don’t use Gmail, any email I send to Gmail users is in their archives
  • Ama­zon = knows about a lot of things I pur­chase and read (includ­ing via my Kindle)
  • Face­book = knows a lot about what I say about myself via sta­tus updates and who my friends are
  • Friend­Feed (now owned by Face­book) = aggre­gates a lot about what I say about myself pub­licly online, plus which con­ver­sa­tions and peo­ple I watch on the site
  • Net­flix = knows a lot about what I watch
  • Foursquare = knows some about where I am/go
  • Flickr = knows a lot about where I am/go, who my friends/contacts are, and what inter­ests me
  • Twit­ter = knows my net­work and who I inter­act with the most
  • Health care provider = I’m lucky that I’ve been rel­a­tively healthy, but my provider(s) know about any problems
  • Deli­cious = knows a lot about sites I’ve vis­ited and want to remember
  • Dopplr = knows my trips and some of my friends
  • Ever­note = knows about some things I want to remem­ber, although I haven’t put much per­sonal infor­ma­tion there yet
  • Illi­nois Depart­ment of Trans­porta­tion (IDOT) = I don’t drive nearly as much as I used to any­more, but IDOT knows when I go on tollroads

Obvi­ously I’m okay with what I share pub­licly, and in many respects, there have been enor­mous ben­e­fits to doing that, but I have very lit­tle con­trol over what these com­pa­nies do with the infor­ma­tion they’re col­lect­ing about me, and I don’t trust any of them. I think the only com­pany I do trust is LISHost, which hosts my web­site and email (thanks, Blake!). How much do I really care that Face­book keeps my sta­tus updates for­ever, whereas my email provider keeps my more pri­vate mes­sages? And how much do I worry that my pri­vate email still goes through my cable provider’s net­work to get to LISHost?

I’m try­ing to rec­og­nize which com­pa­nies are col­lect­ing ambi­ent infor­ma­tion about me, with­out me proac­tively post­ing any­thing. I’m sure I’m miss­ing some, though. If you’ve thought through this your­self, what’s not on my list?


6:44 am Comments (8)

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